computer

The Brain as Computer: Bad at Math, Good at Everything Else

The Brain as Computer: Bad at Math, Good at Everything Else

Modeling computers after the brain could revolutionize robotics and big data Illustration: Chad Hagen 1. A Unique Machine Illustration: Chad Hagen Painful exercises in basic arithmetic are a vivid part of our elementary school memories. A multiplication like 3,752 × 6,901 carried out with just pencil and paper for assistance may well take up to a minute.(…)

Cheek Haptics and Other Weird Computer Interfaces from CHI 2017

Cheek Haptics and Other Weird Computer Interfaces from CHI 2017

All the weirdest computer interfaces from CHI 2017 Image: ACM SIGCHI The ACM CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems is taking place in Denver this week, and just like last year, it’s host to some amazing, incredible, and utterly bizarre technology demos. This year’s theme is “Explore, Innovate, Inspire,” which, as far as(…)

Three Computer Games That Make Assembly Language Fun

Three Computer Games That Make Assembly Language Fun

Human Resource Machine, TIS-100, and Shenzhen I/O teach low-level coding Photo: Randi Klett Photo: Randi Klett Ah, assembly. Where all the pretense of high-level languages—the program structures, the data handling, the wealth of functions—gets stripped away. You get branches, bytes, and if you’re lucky, a subtraction command. True, directly manipulating the state of a computer can be(…)

IBM Expanding Cloud Quantum Computer 10-Fold

IBM Expanding Cloud Quantum Computer 10-Fold

The goal: a 50-qubit commercial universal quantum computer within 5 years Photo: Connie Zhou for IBMIBM quantum computing researchers Hanhee Paik [left] and Sarah Sheldon [right] examine a piece of quantum computing hardware at IBM’s T. J. Watson Research Center in Yorktown, N.Y. IBM is building the first commercially available universal quantum computer, one it(…)

Graphene Could Buttress Next-Gen Computer Chip Wiring

Graphene Could Buttress Next-Gen Computer Chip Wiring

Current can literally blow copper interconnects away, but graphene could keep them intact Image: Stanford University Images: Stanford University Death By Electromigration: Copper interconnects are now so narrow that current can cause a break by knocking atoms out of place. Most of the hand-wringing over the fate of Moore’s Law focuses on the ever-shrinking silicon(…)