Brain

The New Brain Behind the Whiteboards—and More—for HBO’s Silicon Valley

The New Brain Behind the Whiteboards—and More—for HBO’s Silicon Valley

This year many of the formulas, documents, and snippets of engineer-speak on HBO’s Silicon Valley will be coming from Stanford post-doc Dmitri Pavlichin Photo: Tekla Perry Dmitri Pavlichin When the HBO show that became Silicon Valley was still in development, and its creators decided its fictional startup would be in the compression business, they turned(…)

Treating Depression With Deep Brain Stimulation Works—Most of the Time

Treating Depression With Deep Brain Stimulation Works—Most of the Time

Two new studies show good results on DBS for depression, but the treatment is still far from clinical use Illustration: Alfred Pasieka/SPL/Getty Images Here are three things we know about deep brain stimulation (DBS) as a treatment for severe depression:  1. When the pacemaker-like brain implants do help depressed people, they get dramatically better. “I(…)

Video Friday: Brain Scanning Baxter, Burger Flipping Arm, and Elevators with Feelings

Video Friday: Brain Scanning Baxter, Burger Flipping Arm, and Elevators with Feelings

Your weekly selection of awesome robot videos Video Friday is your weekly selection of awesome robotics videos, collected by your Automaton bloggers. We’ll also be posting a weekly calendar of upcoming robotics events for the next two months; here’s what we have so far (send us your events!): IEEE SSRR – March 10-13, 2017 – Shanghai, China(…)

5 Things You Missed This Week: the start of a self-driving car IP war, 1-step brain hacking, and more

5 Things You Missed This Week: the start of a self-driving car IP war, 1-step brain hacking, and more

Highlights from the week of 20 February 2017 Photo: Waymo 1. Is Waymo’s $ 500-million fight with Uber the first shot in a self-driving car intellectual property war? Photo: Eic Risberg/AP Photo Knowing only Waymo’s side of the story, Uber engineer Anthony Levandowski looks like he’s been caught using his former employer’s trade secrets to(…)

A Low-Power Artificial Synapse Could One Day Interface with the Brain

A Low-Power Artificial Synapse Could One Day Interface with the Brain

Battery technology inspires a flexible, organic nonvolatile device for neuromorphic circuits that needs only millivolts to change state Photo: Stanford University A team based at Stanford University and at Sandia National Laboratories, in Livermore, Calif., have created a new form of “artificial synapse” that may one day be used to create flexible circuitry that could directly interface(…)

New Record: Paralyzed Man Uses Brain Implant to Type 8 Words Per Minute

New Record: Paralyzed Man Uses Brain Implant to Type 8 Words Per Minute

And autocomplete software should dramatically boost performance for this brain-computer interface Image: Stanford University “What did you enjoy the most about your trip to the Grand Canyon?” the Stanford researchers asked.  In response, a cursor floated across a computer screen displaying a keyboard, and confidently picked out one letter at a time. The woman controlling(…)

Flexibility Gives Nanothread Brain Probes Long-Term Durability

Flexibility Gives Nanothread Brain Probes Long-Term Durability

Nanoprobe could improve study of diseases such as Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s Image: University of Texas at Austin For over two decades, electrodes implanted in the brain have made it possible to electrically measure the activity of individual neurons. While the technology has continued to progress over the years, the implanted probes have continued to suffer(…)

AI Predicts Autism From Infant Brain Scans

AI Predicts Autism From Infant Brain Scans

Increased brain growth during the first year of life accurately predicted whether a child at high risk of autism developed the disorder Photo: iStockphoto Twenty-two years ago, researchers first reported that adolescents with autism spectrum disorder had increased brain volume. During the intervening years, studies of younger and younger children showed that this brain “overgrowth”(…)